The High Cost of Living Rural: A Q&A with a Journalist Covering Healthcare in Appalachia

Written for 100 Days in Appalachia. Read the original piece here.

Rural hospitals across the country are closing in large numbers, making emergency and speciality services harder and harder to come by for Americans who don’t live in urban centers. One hundred and thirteen rural hospitals have closed since 2010, and about a third of the remaining, some 670, were at risk of closing in 2016.

Mason Adams, who is based in Floyd County, Virginia, detailed the impacts of those closures on rural Appalachians in his latest report for In These Times. That includes the increased travel times that many older, poorer Appalachians now face to reach the medical services they need, sometimes requiring helicopter rides in emergency situations that can cost upwards of more than $44,000, more than the average annual income in many of the communities directly effected. 

Adams also details the difficulty communities face in finding adequate services after their local facilities downgrade the services they offer after consolidations in rural healthcare systems, such as trauma care and neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), all of which contribute to the growing cost of rural health care.

Adams spoke with 100 Days in Appalachia’s Kristen Uppercue about his reporting. 

Read the full interview on 100 Days in Appalachia’s website.

Top image: Natanael Melchor, Unsplash

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